Sunday, October 30, 2011

More About The Beer Brothers

Sounds like classic rock but its actually all fresh tracks. Guitarist Doug Ellman uses zero effects except a wah pedal on one track and heaps of slide.Its all vintage guitars cranked through an old tube amp. Jim Keegan has been playing the same vintage Fender J-bass for a millennium and there are no better drummers around than Ray Williams. The Beer Brothers all sing lead and get into intense close harmony and have distinct separate voices keeping each track new.

The Beer Brothers having been on an extended tour of Florida for over a dozen years tend to write about life in the Sunshine State. From the comedic Boca Homeless to the town of Hollywood and well of course something they are well versed in....BEER!

The band has incredible fun on stage and so does the audience...sincere Ray is made to laugh by not one but 2 resident class clowns Doug and Jim. Depending on the mood of the band, the audience or time and space The Brothers can launch into long improvisations that would satisfy any Jam Band aficionado. Just keep in mind right when you think they are getting serious they will make you laugh!

Sunday, October 23, 2011

Acoustic or electric? That is the question!

Are you torn between playing the acoustic or electric guitar? Both of them have their own pros and cons, but it really just depends on the sound you're looking for!

 If you're more of a folk, country or bluegrass fan, you'd probably enjoy the acoustic guitar. Whereas if you're more drawn to metal, or hard rock, the electric guitar is where you'll find your fun! Choosing a guitar that closely represents the music you enjoy gives you an upper hand and you'll probably learn to play faster since you've got music to mimic while you practice.

The acoustic guitar is easy to grab and go and play wherever you are - home, the beach, the bus stop, anywhere! You don't need an amp or any electronic accessories. Keep in mind though, that acoustic guitars tend to be bulkier than electric guitars and can be slightly more difficult to learn.

Electric guitars are great because they offer a great deal of sound diversity with distortion and effects. You can create aggressive sounds that acoustic guitars aren't capable of. Electric guitars are thinner than acoustic guitars and are easy to carry, but if you want to take advantage of all of the sound capabilities you'll need electricity and an amp with you.

If you still aren't sure what you'd like to play, take matters into your own hands and go to your local music store and play both for a while. Maybe you'll find that you naturally gravitate to one over the other. Who knows, maybe you'll be rocking house like The Beer Brothers Band someday! 

Friday, October 21, 2011

What is Your Message?

When writing your own music, you have to think about the message you're trying to convey. Some artists deliver messages of love, some of life, some of fun.

Take The Beer Brothers Band for example. We've been around the block a few times and we tell it like it is. Our music is brutally honest, downright hilarious and when you think we're being serious, think again! We're just here to have fun with a beer in hand laughs in the audience. We mix rock, blues, and on stage improv to give you a show you'll never forget. If convention is what you're here for, you certainly won't find it in our show!

Stop by our site and check out our CD. If you love what you hear and we give you some good laughs, let us know. We'd be thrilled to play at your next event or even just a casual house party. We guarantee you nothing less than a hilariously good time!

And remember, whether your message is silly or serious, stick to something that is meaningful to you!

Sunday, October 9, 2011

Anatomy of a Drumset!

There's more to a drumset than a snare and your hi-hat symbol! Get to know this essential instrument and what each part of a drumset is for!

1. Snare Drum - Snare drums are available in shallow or deep designs to create high to low cracking sounds when struck. A cluster of snares (usually curled metal wires) are stretched across the bottom head of the drum and give the snare its distinctive snap-like sound.

2. Bass (or Kick) Drum - The kick drum is a very large drum that creates a very low "thump" sound. In pop music, the bass drum is used to keep time (or the beat) within a song.

3. Bass Drum Pedal - used to strike the bass drum. In more advanced sets, a double bass pedal can be installed to create a more versatile sound.

4. Tom-Toms - these are typically smaller in diameter than the snare, but have not wires strung across the bottom, and are typically longer to create deeper tones. They are usually fitted with adjustable mountings for floor stands on attached to the top of the kick drum. 

5. Floor Tom - A double-headed tom-tom with legs mounted to the side so the drum can stand alone. Floor toms usually have a deeper tone than the typical tom-toms. Floor toms are usually placed on the right side of the set, to the right of the tom-toms.

6. Hi-Hat and Pedal - The hi-hat cymbal rests on a stand to the left of the snare drum and consists of two individual cymbals and a pedal which, when pressed, brings the two symbols together to create a crashing sound. If the hi-hat is struck while the pedal is pressed, a short sound can be created, often to hold the beat of a song on conjunction with the kick drum. A hi-hat stuck when the pedal is released produces a high, sustained sound.

7. Cymbals - Cymbals are made in a variety of shapes and designs and can create several different sounds depending on the needs of the song. They are typically used to accent a traditional beat and add flare to any song. Advanced drumsets can have many cymbals surrounding the drums.

There you have it! The anatomy of a drumset isn't as overwhelming as you'd think! As always, thank you for visiting the Beer Brothers Band Blog! 

Source: DrumSoloArtist

Sunday, September 18, 2011

How to Use an Audio Mixer

Audio mixers are one of the most commonly used pieces of equipment in live performance and recording. Here are some tips and tricks for using one correctly!

1. Make sure all of your cables (going to and from the mixer) are plugged in properly. 

2. Plan out your inputs. Make sure you know which source is plugged into which specific channel. Once they're plugged in you can alter each source individually.

3. Adjust the level of your signals going into the mixer by adjusting the gain.  
4. Keep your levels out of the red. If your signals are in the red, you'll hear distortion in the recording. The further down your levels are (in the negative numbers) the clearer the source will sound. 

5. Learn about all of the mixer's features and take advantage of them. You can create a wide variety of sounds and effects if you know how to use your mixer properly.

Having a good understanding of your mixer can also help you when working with other mixers in the future, especially more advanced mixers. 

As always, The Beer Brothers Band thanks you for checking out our blog! Rock on! 

Source: eHow